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1: Programs [clear filter]
Thursday, July 18
 

10:30am

Comics Arts Conference Session #1: Comics, Horror, and Space
Andrea Greenbaum (Barry University) examines the cultural construction of horror and what it means to be monstrous in Emil Ferris's My Favorite Thing Is Monsters. Tiffany Babb (The New School) explores how Cullen Bunn and Tyler Crook's Harrow County uses character doubling to emphasize the adolescent's inner struggles against determination and expectation. Clarissa Rubio Goldsmith (Arizona State University) analyzes how Brian K. Vaughan's Barrier and Sean Lewis's Coyotes engage with immigration myths and participate in and complicate the denial of personhood and rights to marginalized populations.

Thursday July 18, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 26AB

12:00pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #2: Copyright, Comics, and Considerations: Facts About Fair Use in the Classroom
In a highly interactive panel, Heidi Howard Tandy (Nova Southeastern University), Cathy Leogrande (Le Moyne College), and Rachael Vaughn (Google, Inc.) address key topics for educators, librarians, museum curators, and fans about using comics within the existing legal framework, including copyright limitations, the history of copyright law, fair use, free speech, and the public domain, and discuss sample cases that illustrate these principles. This panel will provide participants with accurate information to facilitate innovative projects and works and with tools to take back to their workplaces to use and support their colleagues in innovative uses of comics to educate, inform, and inspire creativity.

Thursday July 18, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 26AB

1:00pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #3: When Cease and Desist Becomes Change and Discuss: How Lawyers Can Publicly Impact the Comic Diegesis
James R. Thompson (Duke University), Daniel Barer (Pollak, Vida & Barer), and Alex Grand (Comic Book Historians Group) look at lawyers' impact on comics narratives, such as the forced pantsing of Howard the Duck by Disney, Marvel's cease-and-desist demands on Cerebus and Dave Sim's inclusion and discussion of those demands within the comic, and Gerber and Kirby's Destroyer Duck. These cease-and-desist letters broke the fourth wall in a way that is now unavoidable, given the public awareness of legal machinations due to the weaponization of social media and the internet.

Thursday July 18, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 26AB

2:00pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #4: What Women Want: Agency, Desire, and Community in Comics
Sydney Heifler (The University of Oxford) uses the historical treatment of romance comics as a case study of how both individual and collective memory affect the historiography of Western comics. Kathleen McClancy (Texas State University) examines how The Coldest City and Velvet engage with Cold War nostalgia to challenge the idea that either espionage or comics themselves were ever just for men. Sam Langsdale (University of North Texas) argues that Marvel's America queers normative depictions of mainstream superheroes to reevaluate what qualities make a superhero admirable in nonnormative, and thus ultimately more inclusive, ways.

Thursday July 18, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 26AB
 
Friday, July 19
 

10:30am

Comics Arts Conference Session #5: The Dark Side: A Supervillain Reader
If you are interested in supervillains—or, for that matter, their wretched, do-good counterparts, the superheroes—then The Dark Side: A Supervillain Reader is for you. Bringing together essays related to film, history, literature, and contemporary comics, The Dark Side takes an interdisciplinary, multimedia approach to examining the deep history and current status of the supervillain. From the Kingpin to Red Son 's Superman to the fallen god heroes of Irredeemable and Injustice: Gods Among Us, the evolution of the bad guy is an exciting, often surprising one. Hear from contributors Ryan Litsey (Texas Tech University), Wyatt Phillips (Texas Tech University), Randy Duncan (Henderson State University), and Matt McEniry (Texas Tech University) as they engage with the trope's most pressing and central issues and offer the best possible starting point for supervillain studies.

Friday July 19, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 26AB

11:30am

Comics Arts Conference Session #6: Mutant Metaphors
Elisabetta Di Minico (Autonomous University of Madrid) analyzes the X-Men saga to ask why dystopias so often transform diversity into an element of crisis and trauma, revealing the xenophobic, misogynist, and homophobic drifts of our post-truth society. Chris Fennessy (California State University, Los Angeles) examines how New Mutants uses superhero genre conventions to create a unique teen narrative, representing how the violence inherent in superheroics affects teenage development. Monica Geraffo (Fashion Institute of Technology) examines the ways Chris Claremont's Uncanny X-Men uses S&M clothing and sexual liberation as key symbols to explore definitions of power. Michael J. Bittner (North Dakota State University) shows how Claremont's run on Uncanny X-Men subverted queer stereotypes to portray unique alternatives to nonrepresentation and to queer-coded villainy despite editorial restrictions.

Friday July 19, 2019 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room 26AB

1:00pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #7: Manga Around the World
Amanda Kennell (University at Buffalo) argues technology's prominence in Kuwata Jiro's Batman (a.k.a. the Batmanga) reflects social debates within Japan regarding the distinctions between humanity, technology, and post-humanity. Aviya Amir (University of California, Riverside) demonstrates how the Hebrew-language webcomic Tzahal Sempa (IDF Sempai) paradoxically uses “sempai” as part of a demilitarized and homoromantic portrayal of social bonds within the Israeli army. Nicole Larrondo (The University of Texas at Austin) asks why “boys' love” manga has been a systematically stigmatized type of cultural production in Chile—even as most BL books are drawn by women for women—and how the genre expresses female sexuality.

Friday July 19, 2019 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Room 26AB

2:30pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #8: Queer Latin American Identity and Comics: A Conversation with LGBTQ Comic Creators from Latin America
This panel explores the "formally queer" nature of comics and how queer kinship functions across Latin America and beyond. Stereotypical and hegemonic regional, national, religious, and ethnic factors throughout Latin America often erase or oppress individuals' identities that do not conform to patriarchal, Eurocentric, or heteronormative ways of being. For the comic creators participating on this panel, the LGBTQ community and their comics work provide an identity that feels more authentic than other traditional forms of identification. Sam Cannon (Louisiana State University Shreveport) and Camila Gutiérrez (The Pennsylvania State University) present brief academic analyses of and locate comics as a site of belonging for individuals who otherwise transgress borders, languages, nationalities, sexualities, and genders. MJ Barros (Corazón do Obsidiana), Barbara Perez Marquez (The Cardboard Kingdom), and Vicente Casanova (Noiso.Me) discuss their experience as queer Latin American comics creators and their processes of identification and kinship through sequential art.

Friday July 19, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 26AB
 
Saturday, July 20
 

10:30am

Comics Arts Conference Session #9: Focus on Carey Pietsch: Comedy and Fantasy in Comics with Clint McElroy
Learn how Comic-Con special guest Carey Pietsch (Lumberjanes; Adventure Time: Marceline Gone Adrift) helps to adapt The Adventure Zone from podcast, an audio medium, into comics, a visual medium-and how she works with the McElroys to convey the rollicking tone of their dynamic Dungeons & Dragons gameplay. Clint McElroy (War of the Realms: Journey into Mystery) joins in to discuss his role writing the comic and co-creating the podcast, as well as also working with Carey to shape the free-form interaction of D&D into a tighter visual narrative. Peter Coogan (Comics Arts Conference) moderates.

Saturday July 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 26AB

11:30am

Comics Arts Conference Session #10: Conjuring Black Folx: Race, Space, and Hoodoo in Contemporary Comics
How does the use of conjure or rootwork in comic narratives reconfigure identity, morality, and power? This panel explores how, despite its contentious nature, this folk magic has been a fruitful source of critique of the interplay of power and identity and sheds light on the shadowed spaces that still mystify our nation. John Jennings (University of California, Riverside) explores this folk magic as a symbolic narrative device in Jook Joint, Bitter Root, House of Whispers, and Bone Parish that boldly challenges the status quo in comics. Kinitra Brooks (Michigan State University) examines Black women's rootworking traditions via Harrow County and "conjure feminism." Stanford Carpenter (BCAF, Pocket Con) shows how nonbinary trickster figures in Juke Joint call the alignment of might and right into question by moving away from morality and centering the consequences of the struggle to survive and overcome.

Saturday July 20, 2019 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room 26AB

1:00pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #11: Who is the Black Panther? The Psychology of Black Panther, Wakanda, and the Transformative Power of Comic Books
UPDATED: Thu, Jul 11, 05:04PM
Psychologists J. Scott Jordan (Illinois State University), Travis Langley (Henderson State University), Billy San Juan (Daredevil Psychology: The Devil You Know), and Eric Wesselmann (Illinois State University) along with comic book creators Don McGregor (Black Panther), Victor Dandridge, Jr. (Vantage:Inhouse Productions), and Alex Simmons (Blackjack) participate in an in-depth discussion of the psychological issues addressed in Black Panther comics, including microaggressions, cultural representation, social exclusion, gender roles, bullying, individualistic versus holist cultures, forms of collectivism, and the role of ritual in cultural sustainment. The panel addresses the psychological factors at play during the creation of the comic book world of Wakanda as well as the transformative influence of Black Panther comics on both the industry and the public.

Saturday July 20, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 26AB

2:00pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #12: The Poster Session
The CAC's poster session gives attendees the opportunity to interact directly with presenters. Come talk one-on-one with these scholars about their projects! Jason Goldman-Hall (Pioneer High School) outlines the process that teachers can follow to get texts like Pride of Baghdad approved by high school districts and details curricular anchors and assessment opportunities. Brandon Daniels (Webster University) uses Black Monday Murders to illustrate and better understand Mark Fisher's concept of the eerie. Michelle D. Miranda (Farmingdale State College, SUNY) explores the role of detection and forensic investigation to demonstrate that the Flash and Batman have risen to a specialized class of superhero-a dual persona of superhero and hero-detective brought about by incorporating detection and forensic science. Danielle Kohfeldt, John Nguyen, and Maricela Correa-Chávez (all California State University, Long Beach) drew on survey results to examine the experiences and perceptions of comics fans and to conclude that a strong sense of community drives fan participation and is essential to comic fan identity. In a study of an upper-division statistics and data management class, Carl Renold (LMFT) found that students who received the material supplemented by a comic book reported higher levels of engagement with the material and less anxiety about the concepts presented. Barbara Glaeser (California State University, Fullerton), Susan Butler (Capistrano Unified School District), and Brianna Flores (writer and illustrator) share their classroom research on the effectiveness of their graphic novel The Talker to teach second- and third-grade students about communication technology that “speaks” for nonverbal children with disabilities. Patrick Murphy (Weber State University) uses Marvel Romance Redux, which rewrote the scripts to Silver Age romance comics but left the art alone, to highlight the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis that language determines the perceived structure of the world. Antonio Chavarria (Museum of Indian Arts and Culture) and Diego Romero (Contemporary Pueblo Potter) present Cochiti Pueblo Potter Romero's historical and autobiographical artworks inspired by comics to create narratives of Native American history, conflict, and identity. Christopher Warren and Jonelle Prideaux (both California State University, Long Beach) present their systematic analysis of mental health representations in comics and the effects on audiences' self-perceptions and mental illness stigma. Edd Schneider and Julia Salvatore (both Ithaca College) present the results of a large-scale content analysis of American superhero comics investigating how head injury is depicted. Noah Simonson (Hillsboro School District) provides information about a 15-week Comics Academy that teaches fourth- to sixth-graders how to collaborate to bring their comic books to life. Eric Bruce, Emily Lilo, Shawn Sellers, and Janet Roberts (all Western Oregon University) use Walking Dead comics to analyze the impact of social exclusion and extreme conditions on diseases of despair and the dimensions of wellness to consider how political and economic climate leads to poor health outcomes. Matt Yockey (University of Toledo) and Deseure DeBerry present an anti-oppressive approach to a STEAM education proposal centered on superhero comics (both reading and creating) integrated into project-based learning. Amy Wagner (University of the Incarnate Word) presents a thematic content analysis of several graphic novels and comics related to various aspects of aging, including caregiving for an aging parent, emotional labor, and the portrayal of illness and disease. Robert Hoffman (The Military Technological College) presents the results from a mixed-methods study conducted at a technical college in the Middle East to see if the introduction of comics into the English Foundation program would result in higher grammar and vocabulary scores on standardized exams. Peter Coogan, Alana Korol, and Elena Biske (all Washington University) discuss and demonstrate how students can do expository, analytical, and nonfiction papers in comics form.

Saturday July 20, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 26AB
 
Sunday, July 21
 

10:30am

Comics Arts Conference Session #13: Photo-Realism in Comics
In a critical climate in which cartooning is the rendering style favored by comics connoisseurs from Scott McCloud to Chris Ware, who will speak up for photo-realism? Bucking current critical trends, Andrei Molotiu (Indiana University, Bloomington), Joseph Witek (Stetson University), and Scott Bukatman (Stanford University) focus attention on photo-realist comic-strip artists like Stan Drake, Leonard Starr, and Neal Adams. McCloud has shown how reader identification works in cartoony comics, but how does it work in photo-realist ones? How does the "graphic acting" of photo-realistically drawn characters differ from that of Peanuts characters? How does the use of photo reference affect critical evaluation in comics?

Sunday July 21, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 26AB

11:30am

Comics Arts Conference Session #14: The Structure of Comics
Neil Cohn (Tilburg University) questions the "universality" of the comics medium by analyzing comics from Europe, Asia, and America, finding patterns that cluster together to differentiate the visual languages used in different types of comics and considering how those patterns may change how people's brains process sequential images. Suzy Kim (Brown University) adapts comics theory to explore London's architecture and the form of the panels that depict it in From Hell, arguing that the visibilities of the body in urban architecture guide readerly attention to the possibilities for movement in urban space on the page. Phillip Vaughan (University of Dundee) traces the history of fumetti (photocomics) in the UK and U.S. in the 1970s and 1980s and their recent comeback in Star Trek: New Visions and software like Comic Life. Through the lenses of comics theory and ludology, Christopher Murray (University of Dundee) considers how webcomics incorporate elements of play with enhanced reader choice to draw out the tension between concepts of games as a kind of experience or as a mode of storytelling.

Sunday July 21, 2019 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room 26AB

1:00pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #15: Comics During Wartime
Francisco Saez de Adana (University of Alcala) presents a study of how readers perceived World War II through the lens of the newspaper strip Terry and the Pirates based on letters sent by readers. Andrew Fogel (Purdue University) traces the reception of the Superman comic strip sequence about Japanese internment camps to examine how Orientalizing Asian peoples during WWII allowed American Jews in the superhero industry to simultaneously leverage their whiteness and express their wartime patriotism. Focusing on The White Donkey: Terminal Lance by U.S. Marine Maximilian Uriarte, Myra Tatum Salcedo (University of Texas Permian Basin), Amanda Salcedo (University of Texas Permian Basin), and Jose Luis Tarango (University of Texas Permian Basin) examine how the “unseen” in gutters enables post-deployment combat veterans to negotiate unseen wounds.

Sunday July 21, 2019 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Room 26AB

2:30pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #16: The Culture of Comic-Con: Field Studies of Fans and Marketing
Comic-Con offers students of popular culture an amazing venue to study how culture is marketed to and practiced by its fans. Jordan Bennett (Radford University), Jenn Dumoulin (University of Ottawa), Braden Dunlap (Indiana University Kokomo), Cheyanne Kramer (Oakland University), Shawn Martin (Radford University), E. Brooke Phipps (Colorado State University), Isaac Price (East Tennessee State University), Jasmine Rorrer (Radford University), Kennedy Schade (Colorado State University), Colin Wheeler (Georgia State University), and Starr Woods (Radford University) present initial findings from a week-long ethnographic field study of the intersection of fan practice at the nexus of cultural marketing and fan culture that is Comic-Con 2019. Matthew J. Smith (Radford University) moderates.

Sunday July 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 26AB